The U.S. court system is criminally unjust How your weight and the time of day can decide the outcome of your court case

Nevada State Personnel WATCH

corrupt judgeFeatured Image -- 23521We like to believe that decisions made in U.S. courts are determined by the wisdom of the Constitution, and guided by fair-minded judges and juries of our peers.

Unfortunately, this is often wishful thinking. Unsettling research into the psychology of courtroom decisions has shown that our personal backgrounds, unconscious biases about race, gender and appearance, and even the time of day play a more important role in outcomes than the actual law.

Adam Benforado, a professor of law at Drexel University, describes these unsettling problems with the justice system in the recently published book “Unfair: The New Science of Criminal Injustice.” The book uses psychology and neuroscience to examine and expose the illogical and unfair ways that judges, jurors, attorneys and others in the legal system make decisions about who is sent to prison, and who walks free.

Benforado’s research shows that mistakes in the criminal justice system are more…

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Help Ty Robben at gofundme.com and support the 7th Amendment protest coming to Reno Nevada August 2015.

Nevada State Personnel WATCH

Help support the 7th Amendment protest coming to Reno Nevada August 2015.

http://www.gofundme.com/8g6pqpf7es

Reno Nevada resident Ty Robben plans to demonstrate in the very near future about the Reno Federal Court and in particular, Judge Miranda Du’s use of summary judgement to dismiss certain causes of action in his civil rights lawsuit against various Carson City officials including former disgraced DA Neil Rombardo , his corrupt assistant DA Mark Krueger and corrupt Carson City justice of the peace “judge” John Tatro.

“I plan to stay in front of the Reno courthouse with my signs until I get my day in court” says Robben.

Ty Robben needs funding to bring “The WORLDS LARGEST CRIME SCENE TAPE” to the Reno Federal Couthouse where he want’s to display the signs ans use his 1st Amendnt rights to protest the violation of his 7th Amendment rights. See previous KOLO news story here: https://youtu.be/gbk0rKPnbfs

Miranda Du judge, Ty Robben says…

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Officer involved in fatal South Lake Tahoe shooting of unarmed man is identified as Joshua Klinge

Reported by: Van Tieu

kris jacksonSOUTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. (MyNews4.com & KRNV) — News 4 has learned the name of the officer involved in a fatal shooting in South Lake Tahoe in June.

Officer Joshua Klinge is on paid administrative leave as the investigation continues, according to South Lake Tahoe police Lieutenant Brian Williams, who confirmed the name Tuesday. This after an attorney for the victim’s family filed a Freedom of Information Act request.

Klinge is under investigation after fatally shooting Kris Jackson, 22, at the Tahoe Hacienda Inn hotel. Jackson, who was on criminal probation, was found to be unarmed.

According to attorney correspondence, the city of South Lake Tahoe is represented by attorney, Bruce Praet, who has built a reputation defending police officers and departments sued for alleged misconduct.

Praet has defended Officer Klinge  before in a civil matter involving a May 2007 officer involved shooting in Ceres, California. The case was settled and dismissed.

According to court documents, Klinge was not the shooting officer in the Ceres case. He was a field training officer at the time.   The plaintiff, Kenya Kwame Moseley, survived and stated the officers exercised an unwarranted and unlawful use of lethal force.

Ceres police officer, James Yandell, shot Moseley in the shoulder and lower back as he was trying to climb a fence after a chase, according to the lawsuit. Mosley was unarmed at the time, and claimed he turned with his hands raised to surrender, but Yandall continued to shoot him, striking him in the arm and abdomen.

Yandell contended the use of force was justified as the man ignored commands to stop, was found to have illegal narcotics on his person, and was seen reaching for his waistband, which Yandell believed could have been a weapon. The defense also added that Moseley was found to have illegal narcotics in his pantspocket and was later found guilty of felony evading and possession of narcotics.