El Dorado County faces suit from pot club

Nevada State Personnel WATCH

california potBy Peter Hecht, Sacrament Bee

The former operator and members of a Diamond Springs marijuana dispensary are suing El Dorado County to recover seized marijuana, medical records and financial documents taken in a Sheriff’s Department raid last year.

The Pure Life Collective has been shuttered since the Nov. 17, 2014, raid, which resulted in the arrest of dispensary operator Kelly Chiusano. No charges have been filed.

The dispensary’s lawsuit, filed by a prominent Bay Area lawyer specializing in medical marijuana, charges that the El Dorado County Sheriff’s Department wrongly raided Pure Life, which had been granted a permit to operate by the county’s Community Development Agency.

The lawsuit, filed last week by Sausalito lawyer Zenia Gilg and law partner Heather Burke, charges that the Sheriff’s Department “wasted public resources” by having undercover officers with physicians’ recommendations purchase medical marijuana at the dispensary and through its delivery service.

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El Dorado County Sheriff’s Office 2014 Annual Report Released

2015-03-06, 07:49:28

El Dorado County Sheriff John D’Agostini is proud to announce the Sheriff’s Office 2014 Annual Report.  In partnership with the community, this report illustrates all of the Sheriff’s Office operations and the work that has been provided over the past year, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  We have continued to provide the wide range of Sheriff’s Office services in keeping with our Mission and Vision statements, utilizing modern methods and traditional values with total enforcement, professionalism and care for our communities.  Sheriff D’Agostini would like to thank each of you for allowing us the honor of serving you and to thank our many community and allied agency partners for our close working relationships.

MESSAGE FROM THE SHERIFF:

On behalf of all of the employees of the El Dorado County Sheriff’s Office, I am presenting with pride our Annual Report for 2014. This report illustrates all of the Sheriff’s Office operations and the work that has been provided over the past year, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

We have continued to provide the wide range of Sheriff’s Office services in keeping with our Mission and Vision statements, utilizing modern methods and traditional values with total enforcement, professionalism and care for our communities.

In 2014 the Sheriff’s Office was faced with two catastrophic wild fires. The Sand and King fires threatened the safety of our citizens and communities. Our resources were stretched to the limit in both disasters. Our staff rose to the challenge and not only provided for the safety of our citizens threatened by the fires but continued to provide all of our daily functions without interruption. During this past year we continued to practice fiscal responsibility and manage our budget effectively.

As I move into my second term we are faced with many challenges. The Realignment Act of 2011, commonly known as AB 109, will continue to challenge our ability to safely manage the jails and provide programs to the inmates to reduce recidivism. In 2014 the voters passed Proposition 47 which reduced many crimes from felonies to misdemeanors. Because of Proposition 47 the Sheriff’s Office will be working to develop new methods to control and solve crime.

We will be continuing to work with the Board of Supervisors to provide for a new Public Safety Center to replace our antiquated and dilapidated facilities. We will continue to manage our budget to provide a significant return on investment of the taxpayer’s monies while delivering quality innovative service.

I would like to thank each of you for allowing us the honor of serving you and to thank our many community and allied agency partners for our close working relationships.

Thank you for your interest in our 2014 Annual Report.
Sincerely, El Dorado County Sheriff John D’Agostini
You can view the report on our website www.edso.org or click the following link:http://pio.edso.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/EDSO2014Annual-Report.pdf

Calif. bill would protect civilians recording police

Nevada State Personnel WATCH

police-brutality-pepper-spray-poster1By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times

From the LAPD beating of Rodney King 24 years ago to last year’s death of Eric Garner after a scuffle with New York police officers, bystanders who recorded the incidents on video have allowed the public to see at least some of what happened.

One California state senator wants to protect citizens who properly record the actions of officers in public from arrest or interference by the police. State Sen. Ricardo Lara, D-Bell Gardens, has introduced legislation that would clarify that a civilian who makes an audio or video recording of a police officer, while the officer is in a public place, is not violating the law.

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3 men arrested in liquor store burglary in South Lake Tahoe

Lorenzo Jackson, 20, Shayan Taghi, 20, and Ryan Mello, 21, all from California

3 men were recently arrested following a burglary at Tahoe Keys Liquor store in South Lake Tahoe, police said.

Lorenzo Jackson, 20, Shayan Taghi, 20, and Ryan Mello, 21, all from California were booked into the El Dorado County Jail on burglary and conspiracy.

Officers responded to a call at about 1 a.m. Wednesday of a burglary alarm activation at Tahoe Keys Liquor, 2297 Lake Tahoe Blvd. Upon arrival, they found two suspects inside the store.

About the same time, deputies arrested a suspect attempting to flee in a car.

“There was evidence to show all three suspects were involved in burglarizing the business,” authorities said in a statement Wednesday. “The exact loss form the store is not known at this time, but included items from inside the store.”…

 

What turns up when a police officer punches your name into the computer.

Nevada State Personnel WATCH

What Do the Cops Have on Me?

Illustration by Robert Neubecker. Click image to expand.

Drew Peterson, the former Bolingbrook, Ill., police sergeant suspected of murdering his third and fourth wives, is now also under investigation forpolice misconduct. New evidence suggests that Peterson used official law-enforcement databases to check up on his fourth wife and her associates before she disappeared. Peterson’s attorney says it was common practice for Bolingbrook police to run checks for friends and family, and to run prank names to alleviate boredom. What can the police learn about you from these database queries?

Your name and aliases; your Social Security number; where you live; when you were born; the color of your skin and eyes; any scars, tattoos, or identifying marks; your height, vision, and gender; what kind of car you drive, whether it’s a stolen…

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South Lake Tahoe crime rates drop

Brian UhlerBy Isaac Brambila
ibrambila@tahoedailytribune.com

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE — A 2014 South Lake Tahoe Police Department (SLTPD) crime report reflected that crime in the city dropped in comparison to 2013.

According to the report, property crimes fell by nearly 12 percent, while violent crime dropped by 3.4 percent.

The drop in crime is a reflection of the community and several other factors, SLTPD Chief Brian Uhler said Monday.

Though Uhler didn’t take credit on behalf of the department for the decrease, he said the department did do its part.

“It is important to recognize that crime rates are heavily influenced by many factors (such as overall economy, demographic change, etc.),” Uhler stated in a press release.

The statistics, in general, were positive, but some types of crimes did see increases.

The most significant drop was seen in property crimes, where, according to the report, the decline was across the board. Burglaries dropped from 171 in 2013 to 147 in 2014, larceny numbers fell from 368 to 332 and motor vehicle thefts dropped from 46 to 37.

To achieve those drops, the police department drew its strategy after noticing that a disproportionate number of the crimes were being committed by a small amount of people, Uhler said. After noticing that trend, they decided to keep track of habitual and repeat offenders as well as drug related crime. The idea was to stay close to those types of offenders to act quickly when they committed a crime to prevent them from committing crimes in the future, as well as to keep attention on them so they don’t return to criminal activity.

As a result of the strategy, the department made 67 felony drug arrests, 24 arrests related to illegal marijuana grows and arrested 56 habitual offenders.

It is common that people who abuse drugs, in general, also usually commit a disproportionate amount of crime compared to the rest of the population, Uhler said. Those arrests likely prevented further crimes from happening.

Regarding violent crime, Uhler said the approach is different than with property crime. He said there is some spillover within the usual offenders of the two types of crime – drug, habitual and repeat offenders – but that the strategy to focus on those types of offenders is most effective with property crime.

Though there was still a drop in violent crime, the decline was less significant than in property crime.

The number of homicides in South Lake Tahoe fell from three in 2013 to zero in 2014, as did the number of aggravated assaults, which went from 89 to 77. The drop in crime, however, did not extend to forcible rapes and robberies. Forcible rapes saw a hike from 8 to 14, while robberies increased from 16 to 21.

Uhler said it is more challenging to have an effect on violent crime than on property crime. It is harder to predict.

“Officers can’t go and patrol inside someone’s home,” he said.

Still, the effort is being placed on combating violent crime. Currently, most investigative work done by the department is related to violent crime. Detectives work mostly on investigating violent crimes, while patrol officers usually investigate property crime.

However, for now, the strategy to fight crime will likely remain the same, with some adjustments.

The department is in the process of developing and increasing its investigative capacity. They also plan to further develop the working relationship with the probation department to bolster the focus on repeat, habitual and drug offenders.

For 2015, a point of focus will be the introduction of Proposition 47, which was voted into law last November and focuses on reducing punishments for certain non-violent offenders in an attempt to reduce prison and jail populations. Though it is still early to tell what the impact will be, Uhler said that the next year or two will likely see an increase on some crimes, and that the department will have to adjust to those changes.

Additionally, Uhler insisted that crime reduction is a result of a collaborative effort between the police department and the community.

He took the opportunity to remind people to be diligent about safeguarding their property and pay extra attention to locking up things and keeping things secure.